Category Archives: Classic Calvinism

The Reformed Theology of T.F. Torrance

Last week, Bobby Grow offered some thoughts on his blog The Evangelical Calvinist about his experiences in the infamous “Reformed Pub” discussion group on Facebook after he had been permanently expelled. I can empathize, not because I myself have been banned from the Pub (though I … Continue reading

Posted in Bobby Grow, Classic Calvinism, Confessions, Evangelical Calvinism, Karl Barth, Reformed theology, T.F. Torrance, Word of God

Reforming Calvinism: Why Universal Atonement Does Not Entail Universal Salvation

In a post in which I explained T.F. Torrance’s contention that the traditional Calvinist doctrine of limited atonement implies a heretical Christology, specifically that of Nestorianism. Following Torrance, I argued that a fully orthodox Christology, resting on the twofold concept … Continue reading

Posted in Atonement, Christology, Classic Calvinism, Evangelical theology, Five points of Calvinism, Incarnation, Judgment of God, Reformed theology, Reforming Calvinism, Sin and evil, Soteriology, T.F. Torrance, Universalism, Vicarious humanity of Christ | 7 Comments

Reforming Calvinism: Why the Doctrine of Limited Atonement Implies a Heretical Christology

T.F. Torrance is known to have criticized the traditional Calvinist doctrine of limited atonement (i.e. that Christ died in an efficacious way only for the elect) on the basis of its implicit Nestorianism, the early Christological heresy, condemned by the … Continue reading

Posted in Atonement, Christology, Church history, Classic Calvinism, Election, Evangelical Calvinism, Five points of Calvinism, Heresy/Heterodoxy, Incarnation, Karl Barth, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Predestination, Reformed theology, Reforming Calvinism, Soteriology, T.F. Torrance, Vicarious humanity of Christ | 10 Comments

To Give Thanks: Francis Turretin vs. Karl Barth on God’s Sovereignty vis-à-vis the Problem of Evil

I found Christopher Green’s comparison between the views of the two theological giants that were Francis Turretin and Karl Barth regarding God’s sovereignty vis-à-vis evil very illuminating, so I thought I would share it. Green writes: In the traditional teaching, the … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Federal theology, Francis Turretin, Karl Barth, Providence, Reformed theology, Sin and evil, Sovereignty of God

Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Bruce McCormack on Limited Atonement vs. Universal Salvation

Typically when we encounter passages in Scripture that seem to stand in tension, we instinctively try to find a way to alleviate that tension. Nowhere is this more evident than in relation to the tension we feel between the texts … Continue reading

Posted in Apostle Paul, Atonement, Biblical interpretation, Bruce McCormack, Classic Calvinism, Confessions, Dialectical theology, Five points of Calvinism, Judgment of God, Reformed theology, Theological methodology, Universalism

Horton vs. Barth on Law vs. Grace

In a critical essay of Karl Barth’s Christology, Michael Horton writes the following: It seems to me that the main reason that Barth resists talk of “before” and “after” in [redemptive history] is that this would open up a space … Continue reading

Posted in American evangelicalism, Apostle Paul, Biblical interpretation, Bobby Grow, Classic Calvinism, Cornelius Van Til, Covenantal theology, Doctrine of God, Evangelical theology, Federal theology, Gospel, Grace of God, Karl Barth, Law & Gospel, Michael Horton, Peter Leithart, Protestant theology, Reformed theology

Crossing the Tiber in a Boat Called ‘Analogy of Being’

In recent posts I have suggested that rather than carry forward the trajectory initiated by the Reformation, the Protestant ‘orthodox’ who came later actually reversed direction in many ways, one of which was their return to the synthesis of faith … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Confessions, Doctrine of God, Federal theology, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, Richard Muller, Roman Catholicism, Scholasticism, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism | 10 Comments

Nein! to the Metaphysical God: Torrance on Van Til on Barth

In the last couple of posts (here and here), I have been considering the metaphysical and broader philosophical underpinnings of much Protestant and Reformed theology. As illustrative of this, I have engaged somewhat with the most vehement critic and opponent of Karl … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Classical theism, Cornelius Van Til, Critiques of Karl Barth, Doctrine of God, Federal theology, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Orthodoxy, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, Revelation, T.F. Torrance, Word of God | 3 Comments

All That Glimmers Isn’t Gold: Faith and Reason in Reformed Orthodoxy vs. Karl Barth

Inspired by R. Scott Clark’s recent post over at the Heidelblog in which he offered a quote from Cornelius Van Til on the importance of Aristotle for Reformed theology, I wrote a post of my own in which I corroborated his point with reference … Continue reading

Posted in Bruce McCormack, Christology, Classic Calvinism, Cornelius Van Til, Critiques of Karl Barth, Doctrine of God, Doctrine of sin, Evangelical Calvinism, Federal theology, Five Solas, Grace of God, John Calvin, Justification, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, R. Scott Clark, Reformation, Reformed theology, Revelation, Roman Catholicism, Ron Frost, Scholasticism, Theological methodology, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism | 1 Comment

Pagan Riches for God’s Temple?: Clark, Van Til, and Muller on Aristotle’s Influence on Protestant/Reformed Orthodoxy

One of the things that I have mentioned in the past here on Reformissio (and about which I have learned much from Bobby Grow) is the influence of Aristotle on Protestant, and specifically Reformed orthodox theology. Recently I interacted with … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Classical theism, Cornelius Van Til, Doctrine of God, Evangelical Calvinism, Federal theology, Irenaeus, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, R. Scott Clark, Reformation, Reformed theology, Richard Muller, Ron Frost, Scholasticism, Thomism | 7 Comments