Category Archives: Nature and grace

The Cross Alone: Martin Luther’s Sixth Sola of the Reformation (The Heidelberg Disputation, 1518)

Recently I have written about the theologia crucis — the theology of the cross — that constituted in many ways Martin Luther’s most important discovery, a discovery that gave rise to his entire vision for church reform. Although Luther is perhaps remembered … Continue reading

Posted in Apostle Paul, Church history, Doctrine of God, Gospel, Grace of God, Knowledge of God, Martin Luther, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Reformation, Revelation, Roman Catholicism, Scholasticism, Theologia crucis, Theological methodology, Thomas Aquinas

The Only Point of Contact: Karl Barth on the Possibility of Knowing the Word of God

Following yesterday’s post on why Jesus Christ in the gospel is the only apologetic for the truth of the Word of God, I thought that the following section from Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics I/1 was a fitting supplement to what was said concerning our inability … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Gospel, Karl Barth, Missiology, Mission & evangelism, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Preaching, Reformed theology, Soteriology, Word of God | 2 Comments

We Have the Mind of Christ: T.F. Torrance on the Relation between Faith and Reason

In a recent post I enlisted the assistance of T.F. Torrance in order to navigate the difficult tension between the universal and particular aspects of the biblical witness to Christ’s work and human salvation. In this post, I would like to … Continue reading

Posted in Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, T.F. Torrance, Theological methodology, Thomism

The Virgin Birth as the Judgment of Grace: Karl Barth on the Miracle of Christmas

The following reflection on the virgin birth is excerpted from Karl Barth, Church dogmatics I/2, London; New York: T&T Clark. p.172. In the [virgin birth of Christ] there is contained a judgment upon man. When Mary as a virgin becomes the … Continue reading

Posted in Creeds, Devotional, Grace of God, Judgment of God, Karl Barth, Nature and grace, Seasonal, Soteriology | 2 Comments

A Fragile Glory: John Calvin on the Grandeur of Human Inability

John Calvin has the unfortunate reputation of having been a rather dour and depressive individual. Among the countless caricatures that have proliferated in various publications about Calvin, perhaps Pope Francis said it best when he called Calvin “that cold Frenchman” who … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Apostle Paul, John Calvin, Nature and grace, Pope Francis, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, Soteriology, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism, Union with Christ

Karl Barth’s “Radical Revision of Revelation”

In the preface to the first volume of his Church Dogmatics, Karl Barth famously quipped: I can see no third alternative between that exploitation of the analogia entis which is legitimate only on the basis of Roman Catholicism…and a Protestant theology which … Continue reading

Posted in Classical theism, Critiques of Karl Barth, Doctrine of God, Karl Barth, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Revelation, Richard Muller, Roman Catholicism, Soteriology, Thomism | 1 Comment

Crossing the Tiber in a Boat Called ‘Analogy of Being’

In recent posts I have suggested that rather than carry forward the trajectory initiated by the Reformation, the Protestant ‘orthodox’ who came later actually reversed direction in many ways, one of which was their return to the synthesis of faith … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Confessions, Doctrine of God, Federal theology, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, Richard Muller, Roman Catholicism, Scholasticism, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism | 10 Comments

All That Glimmers Isn’t Gold: Faith and Reason in Reformed Orthodoxy vs. Karl Barth

Inspired by R. Scott Clark’s recent post over at the Heidelblog in which he offered a quote from Cornelius Van Til on the importance of Aristotle for Reformed theology, I wrote a post of my own in which I corroborated his point with reference … Continue reading

Posted in Bruce McCormack, Christology, Classic Calvinism, Cornelius Van Til, Critiques of Karl Barth, Doctrine of God, Doctrine of sin, Evangelical Calvinism, Federal theology, Five Solas, Grace of God, John Calvin, Justification, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, R. Scott Clark, Reformation, Reformed theology, Revelation, Roman Catholicism, Ron Frost, Scholasticism, Theological methodology, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism | 1 Comment

Pagan Riches for God’s Temple?: Clark, Van Til, and Muller on Aristotle’s Influence on Protestant/Reformed Orthodoxy

One of the things that I have mentioned in the past here on Reformissio (and about which I have learned much from Bobby Grow) is the influence of Aristotle on Protestant, and specifically Reformed orthodox theology. Recently I interacted with … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Classical theism, Cornelius Van Til, Doctrine of God, Evangelical Calvinism, Federal theology, Irenaeus, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, R. Scott Clark, Reformation, Reformed theology, Richard Muller, Ron Frost, Scholasticism, Thomism | 7 Comments

Reforming Calvinism, pt. 19: Irresistible Grace (The Lord and Giver of Life)

In the previous entry in my series Reforming Calvinism, I answered a question frequently raised regarding the vicarious humanity of Christ, namely, does Christ’s believing in our flesh and on our behalf lessen or eliminate the necessity and importance of our own faith? … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Christology, Classic Calvinism, Creeds, Doctrine of God, Five points of Calvinism, Gospel, Holy Spirit, Incarnation, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Nature and grace, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Reformed theology, Reforming Calvinism, Sacramentalism, Soteriology, T.F. Torrance, Trinity, Union with Christ