Category Archives: Orthodoxy

“There Is the Catholic Church”: Ignatius of Antioch on the Apostolate, the Episcopate, and the Unity of the Faith

Ignatius of Antioch is an important figure in church history, providing a crucial link between the apostolic and post-apostolic eras. Among the many significant details that we learn from his writings about the development of early Christianity, one stands out in particular: the … Continue reading

Posted in Church history, Ecclesiology, John Behr, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Roman Catholicism | Leave a comment

The Continuity of the Faith: Irenaeus on Church Tradition and Apostolic Succession (and Why I, as a Protestant, Can Wholeheartedly Agree)

In this post, I would like to continue discussing the relation articulated by early church father Irenaeus of Lyons between Scripture, tradition, and church authority. The response to my first post on this topic (which you can read here) was to … Continue reading

Posted in Church history, Critiques of Protestantism, Five Solas, Irenaeus, John Behr, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Protestant theology, Reformation, Roman Catholicism, Scripture, Sola Scriptura | Leave a comment

“According to the Scriptures”: Irenaeus, the Word of God, and the Tradition of the Church

One of the common criticisms of sola Scriptura is that it has no support prior to the Reformation, especially in the early centuries of church history. Not only is sola Scriptura without patristic support, but (so it is claimed) it represents a total contradiction … Continue reading

Posted in Church history, Critiques of Protestantism, Ecclesiology, Five Solas, Heresy/Heterodoxy, Irenaeus, John Behr, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Protestant theology, Reformed theology, Roman Catholicism, Scripture, Sola Scriptura | 3 Comments

Reforming Calvinism: Why the Doctrine of Limited Atonement Implies a Heretical Christology

T.F. Torrance is known to have criticized the traditional Calvinist doctrine of limited atonement (i.e. that Christ died in an efficacious way only for the elect) on the basis of its implicit Nestorianism, the early Christological heresy, condemned by the … Continue reading

Posted in Atonement, Christology, Church history, Classic Calvinism, Election, Evangelical Calvinism, Five points of Calvinism, Heresy/Heterodoxy, Incarnation, Karl Barth, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Predestination, Reformed theology, Reforming Calvinism, Soteriology, T.F. Torrance, Vicarious humanity of Christ | 10 Comments

The Only Fountain of Salvation: Sola Scriptura and the Faith of the Early Church

One of the most common objections that I hear from Roman Catholics against the five solas of the Reformation, especially to sola Scriptura, is that these were complete novelties invented by the Protestant Reformers in blatant contradiction to the first centuries of church history. … Continue reading

Posted in Athanasius, Biblical interpretation, Creeds, Critiques of Protestantism, Ecumenism, Five Solas, Heresy/Heterodoxy, Homoousion, Irenaeus, John Calvin, John Chrysostom, Martin Luther, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Protestant theology, Protestantism, Reformation, Reformed theology, Reforming Catholicism, Revelation, Roman Catholicism, Scripture, Sola Scriptura, Tertullian, Word of God

The Unfortunate Conception of Mary: The Displacement of Christ and the Demise of the Church

Today, the 8th of December, is the feast of the Immaculate Conception of Mary. In a blog post on the National Catholic Register, Marge Fenelon explains that The doctrine of the Immaculate Conception, proclaimed in 1854 by Pope Pius IX, states that … Continue reading

Posted in Biblical interpretation, Christology, Heresy/Heterodoxy, Karl Barth, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reforming Catholicism, Reformission, Roman Catholicism, Thomas Aquinas

The New Reformation: T.F. Torrance on Retrieving the Nicene and Protestant Pattern of Reform for Today

In a series of recent posts I examined the question “Is the Reformation over?” from a variety of angles and, in each case, I gave a resounding “No!” as the answer. When I say that the Reformation is not over, I … Continue reading

Posted in Christology, Creeds, Five Solas, Grace of God, Holy Spirit, Homoousion, Incarnation, John Calvin, John Knox, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, Reforming Catholicism, Reformission, Roman Catholicism, Soteriology, T.F. Torrance | 2 Comments

Heinrich Bullinger, Sola Scriptura, and the Catholicity of the Reformation

One of the most pervasive misunderstandings of the Protestant doctrine and practice of sola Scriptura is that such a notion is naive at best and dangerous at worse because it essentially opens the door to any number of contradictory interpretations of Scripture. … Continue reading

Posted in Biblical interpretation, Creeds, Five Solas, Heinrich Bullinger, John Calvin, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, Reforming Catholicism, Richard Muller, Roman Catholicism, Word of God | 15 Comments

Was T.F. Torrance a Mere Barthian? Nein!

It is fairly safe to say that those who appreciate Karl Barth also appreciate T.F. Torrance, and vice versa. Although some may prefer either Barth or Torrance for various reasons, I think it would be a rare occurrence to find someone … Continue reading

Posted in Athanasius, Karl Barth, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Paul Molnar, Protestant theology, Reformed theology, Richard Muller, T.F. Torrance

Evangelical, Catholic, and Reformed Redux

When I first started this blog, I wrote a post entitled ‘Evangelical, Catholic, and Reformed‘ (borrowed from George Hunsinger’s book of the same name) in which I set out these three adjectives as descriptive of the general themes and topics … Continue reading

Posted in Biblical interpretation, Confessions, Creeds, Evangelical theology, General, Gospel, John Webster, Karl Barth, Orthodoxy, Patristic theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, T.F. Torrance, Theological methodology