Category Archives: Scholasticism

The Cross Alone: Martin Luther’s Sixth Sola of the Reformation (The Heidelberg Disputation, 1518)

Recently I have written about the theologia crucis — the theology of the cross — that constituted in many ways Martin Luther’s most important discovery, a discovery that gave rise to his entire vision for church reform. Although Luther is perhaps remembered … Continue reading

Posted in Apostle Paul, Church history, Doctrine of God, Gospel, Grace of God, Knowledge of God, Martin Luther, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Reformation, Revelation, Roman Catholicism, Scholasticism, Theologia crucis, Theological methodology, Thomas Aquinas | Leave a comment

The Catholic Roots of Luther’s Gospel: The Sacrament of Penance and the Surety of Faith

[W]e now turn to the holy sacraments and their blessings to learn to know their benefits and how to use them. Anyone who is granted the time and the grace to confess, to be absolved, and to receive the sacrament … Continue reading

Posted in Assurance, Church history, Critiques of Protestantism, Ecumenism, Five Solas, Heresy/Heterodoxy, Justification, Law & Gospel, Martin Luther, Protestant theology, Protestantism, Reformation, Roman Catholicism, Sacramentalism, Scholasticism, Soteriology, Stephen Strehle, Thomas Aquinas, Word of God

Augustine Contra Aristotle: The Stimulus for Martin Luther’s Vision for Reform

It is often believed, especially among Roman Catholics, that Martin Luther, and the Reformation that he inspired, set in opposition the individual’s conscience and interpretation of Scripture against the authority of the Catholic Church. Who did Luther think he was, … Continue reading

Posted in Augustine, Biblical interpretation, Church history, Critiques of Protestantism, Martin Luther, Nominalism/Voluntarism, Patristic theology, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Protestantism, Reformation, Reforming Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Scholasticism, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism

Rediscovering the Scandalous God: Martin Luther’s Theology of the Cross (The Heidelberg Disputation of 1518)

Although we think of Luther’s famous 95 theses as sparking the Reformation in 1517, it would perhaps be more accurate to accord this honor to the theses that he prepared for the disputation in Heidelberg in 1518. It was at this event that … Continue reading

Posted in Church history, Dialectical theology, Doctrine of God, Justification, Law & Gospel, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Reformation, Scholasticism, Suffering, Theologia crucis | 1 Comment

An Ocean of Love Unspeakable: Martin Luther’s Rediscovery of Christ’s Centrality (Reformission Monday)

It is Martin Luther week here at Reformissio! Last week I had the privilege (and fulfillment of a long-time desire) to visit Wittenberg, the home of Martin Luther and the birthplace of the Reformation. Living in Europe has its perks, one … Continue reading

Posted in Apostle Paul, Christology, Church history, Five Solas, Gospel, H.R. Mackintosh, Incarnation, Martin Luther, Mission & evangelism, Protestant theology, Protestantism, Reformation, Reforming Catholicism, Reformission, Roman Catholicism, Scholasticism, Theologia crucis | 2 Comments

Crossing the Tiber in a Boat Called ‘Analogy of Being’

In recent posts I have suggested that rather than carry forward the trajectory initiated by the Reformation, the Protestant ‘orthodox’ who came later actually reversed direction in many ways, one of which was their return to the synthesis of faith … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Confessions, Doctrine of God, Federal theology, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, Richard Muller, Roman Catholicism, Scholasticism, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism | 10 Comments

All That Glimmers Isn’t Gold: Faith and Reason in Reformed Orthodoxy vs. Karl Barth

Inspired by R. Scott Clark’s recent post over at the Heidelblog in which he offered a quote from Cornelius Van Til on the importance of Aristotle for Reformed theology, I wrote a post of my own in which I corroborated his point with reference … Continue reading

Posted in Bruce McCormack, Christology, Classic Calvinism, Cornelius Van Til, Critiques of Karl Barth, Doctrine of God, Doctrine of sin, Evangelical Calvinism, Federal theology, Five Solas, Grace of God, John Calvin, Justification, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, R. Scott Clark, Reformation, Reformed theology, Revelation, Roman Catholicism, Ron Frost, Scholasticism, Theological methodology, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism | 1 Comment

Pagan Riches for God’s Temple?: Clark, Van Til, and Muller on Aristotle’s Influence on Protestant/Reformed Orthodoxy

One of the things that I have mentioned in the past here on Reformissio (and about which I have learned much from Bobby Grow) is the influence of Aristotle on Protestant, and specifically Reformed orthodox theology. Recently I interacted with … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Classical theism, Cornelius Van Til, Doctrine of God, Evangelical Calvinism, Federal theology, Irenaeus, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Martin Luther, Natural theology, Nature and grace, Philosophy, Protestant theology, R. Scott Clark, Reformation, Reformed theology, Richard Muller, Ron Frost, Scholasticism, Thomism | 7 Comments

Richard Muller and the Demise of “Calvin vs. the Calvinists”

In the world of Reformation and post-Reformation Protestant studies, the name of Richard Muller looms large. Among the many scholars working in the field, Muller distinguishes himself for his seemingly endless and virtually encyclopedic knowledge in his area of expertise. … Continue reading

Posted in Classic Calvinism, Confessions, Critiques of Karl Barth, Evangelical Calvinism, Federal theology, John Calvin, Karl Barth, Protestant theology, Reformation, Reformed theology, Richard Muller, Scholasticism, T.F. Torrance, Theological methodology

Reforming Calvinism, pt. 15.2: Irresistible Grace (Critique)

In this second half of the fifteenth entry in my series on Reforming Calvinism, I continue my critique* of the traditional Calvinist doctrine of ‘irresistible grace’ as articulated by R.C. Sproul on the Ligonier blog (the entirety of which can be accessed here). In the … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Classic Calvinism, Evangelical Calvinism, Five points of Calvinism, Grace of God, Holy Spirit, Nature and grace, Protestant theology, R.C. Sproul, Reformed theology, Reforming Calvinism, Richard Muller, Roman Catholicism, Scholasticism, Soteriology, Thomas Aquinas, Thomism | 6 Comments